Skip to Content

Get a FREE assessment of your rental property. Start here!

Get a FREE assessment of your rental property. Start here!

A Property Maintenance Checklist For Every Season

By maintaining your property year-round, you can both protect your investment and enjoy a comfortable, beautiful property. Whether you’re a first-time property owner looking to start things off on the right foot or you’re a seasoned property investor trying to get back into the swing of things, here’s our property maintenance checklist to start you out with what you need to focus on in each and every season.

Spring

Home inspector examines a residential roof vent pipeSpring is a season associated with renewal and starting fresh. After all, it’s the season of “spring cleaning.” It’s also the first time after a cold fall and winter where you can enjoy the outdoors and warming weather. Outside, start by caring for and manicuring your lawn and landscaping once the snow melts off. Mowing your lawn and mulching your flower beds is a great way to prepare for blooming flowers and a beautiful outdoor living space this summer.

You’ll also want to take some time to inspect the roof, gutters, and downspouts for any pooling water or damage from ice and snow over the winter. Speaking of snowmelt and spring showers, make sure your basement’s sump pump is in the correct position and working properly: you don’t want moisture getting into your property’s basement.

Before things heat up too much, you’re going to want a professional to take a look at your air conditioner. Call a local heating and cooling company in New York and have one of their technicians out for a seasonal tune-up. This maintenance is essential to your property’s summertime comfort and energy efficiency. A professional tune-up can also help your air conditioner avoid problems, which means less stress and expense for your summer ahead.

Summer

Relax this summer and enjoy your outdoor space. There are a few simple summer maintenance tasks that you can either handle on your own or call a contractor to perform for you. Due to the heat and humidity outside (and possible vacation plans!), many owners push property maintenance and upkeep to the spring or fall. That’s fine, but it’s also important to make sure everything continues to function properly and that there are no lingering issues.

Check your sprinkler system, wash your windows, and remove lint and dust from your dryer vent. Lint buildup in dryer vents can reduce the efficiency of your dryer and increase the risk of a fire.

If your summer is getting a bit boring and you’re looking for a project, you can take advantage of the nicer weather outside to start a property improvement project. Just how complex this project gets is up to you: remodeling your kitchen obviously requires major time and financial commitment but repainting your interior walls can be done in a weekend for relatively little.

Fall

Plumber repairing an hot-water heaterAt the end of a long, fun-filled summer, it’s time to prepare for the cooler weather ahead. Just like spring, autumn is an ideal time to have an HVAC pro out to look at your furnace or boiler. After all, you don’t want that breaking down on a cold winter night! If your property has a chimney and fireplace, consider having a chimney sweep out to clean it out and make sure it’s ready—and safe to use—in winter when you want to make your property cozier.

Outside, you need to start shutting things down and winterizing outdoor appliances and fixtures, from pools and spas to grills and your air conditioner unit. Once again, check your gutters and downspouts: fall is the most common time for these to clog as leaves start to fall and collect on the roof. You’ll want your gutters clear for late fall rain and winter snow to come.

If you’re looking for other property projects to take on during the fall, this is a great time to review your property’s energy efficiency and make improvements. For example, caulking around windows and adding weatherstripping around doors can lower heat loss and energy waste during the colder months of the year. Adding more attic insulation to trap heat inside your property also is a worthwhile investment.

Winter

Winter is a time to stay warm and protect your property from the worst effects of ice and snow. Look for signs of ice dams and frozen pipes, and ask a contractor about ways to prevent these damages in the future. For example, wrapping your property’s exterior wall pipes in insulated sheathing can help reduce the risk of the pipes freezing. That represents major peace of mind for you and your property moving forward.

Have you maintained your water heater yet this year? Flush your water heater and test the pressure-relief valve to make sure it works when needed. An annual water heater flush helps remove any built up sediment that might be negatively impacting the tank’s storage capacity and energy efficiency. While you’re working on the water heater, check the temperature gauge. In many cases, water heaters are set too hot: if your water heater is set to more than 130 degrees, you’re not only putting a scald risk in your property, but you’re also wasting energy.

No Matter the Season, Work with a Professional

For even experienced property owners, year-round property maintenance may seem daunting. That checklist, even when divided out between the four seasons of the year, may seem massive. Here’s the secret to making things simpler: when in doubt, bring in a professional contractor to help. This is especially important for HVAC maintenance, plumbing repair, and roof inspections that property owners may not be able to handle themselves. When you hire a pro, you get the peace of mind that the work is being done right.

 

For even more seasonal property maintenance tips and tricks, be sure to take a look at this new infographic.

ANNUAL HOME MAINTENANCE CHECKLIST

ANNUAL HOME MAINTENANCE CHECKLIST

We are pledged to the letter and spirit of U.S. policy for the achievement of equal housing opportunity throughout the Nation. See Equal Housing Opportunity Statement for more information.